my-wedding-dreams:

Tools and Supplies

hammer,  wax candles or wax bead, paper of choice, image of choice printed on computer paper, extra computer paper, exacto knife or scissors, plastic bag (to place your candles in), glue stick, iron, bone folder or knife

Instructions

1. Begin by smashing your candle sticks (if you do not have wax beads) within the plastic bag. You’ll want to make sure these are small enough to melt down. One candlestick should be more than enough for a few of these.

2. Once you have your wax into small enough pieces, remove the wick and place the wax in between a fold piece of parchment paper. The paper should be large enough to completely sandwich your image .

3. Iron the wax so it is melted in between the sheets being careful not to spill the hot wax.

4. Next,  place your selected image in between the parchment paper and completely ensconce the paper with the wax. Make sure to get ride of any bubbles.

5. With your image completely covered in wax, remove from the parchment paper and place in between two clean sheets of computer paper. Iron again to remove any excess wax.

6. Let completely dry and then adhere to your selected fine art paper with a glue stick.

7. Use the bone folder or smooth edge of a knife to adhere properly and remove any air bubbles.

Pictures: Katie Decker

nevver:

Art is just another form of screaming

septagonstudios:

Lizzy Stewart

septagonstudios:

Lizzy Stewart

vintagenatgeographic:

Hiking the MacKinnon Pass, New Zealand

National Geographic | January 1978

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

Traffic on 6-lane highway in Los Angeles, 1969 © Ralph Crane

fuckyeahvintage-retro:

Traffic on 6-lane highway in Los Angeles, 1969 © Ralph Crane

angelclark:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

utism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

(via apornstarsfuneral)

brittanyschall:

Yosuke Amemiya

(Source: 9091kwan, via l-a-t-e-x)

brittanyschall:

Yosuke Amemiya

neil-gaiman:

jedavu:

THE DARK SIDE OF DREAMS 

In the late 1960s, photographer Arthur Tress began a series of photographs that were inspired by the dreams of children. Tress had each child he approached tell him about a prominent dream of theirs which Tress would then artistically re-create and photograph with the child as the main subject. 

Haunting…

(via braiker)

wasbella102:

Wrapped in a Mystery

(Source: bcr8tive.com)

wasbella102:

Wrapped in a Mystery

(Source: gintleman, via wasbella102)

wasbella102:

Lady Rococo  by Maximilian San

wasbella102:

Lady Rococo  by Maximilian San

haroldnmod:

The Adventures of Prince Achmed by Lotte Reiniger (1926)

The oldest surviving animated film in history.

(via fuckyeahvintage-retro)

haroldnmod:

The Adventures of Prince Achmed by Lotte Reiniger (1926)
The oldest surviving animated film in history.