sexular:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?” 
And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 
Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.
I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”
I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.
Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.

yo why is it such a problem for men to wear dresses tho? it scares me tbh.

(via apornstarsfuneral)

sexular:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?” 

And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 

Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.

I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”

I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.

Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.


(My Son Wears Dresses And That’s OK With Me | Seth Menachem for xoJane)


yo why is it such a problem for men to wear dresses tho? it scares me tbh.

starrywavves:

Mississippi Masala (Mira Nair, 1991)

(via girlsandguns)

Salvador Dali, Summer.

(Source: thegreatage, via l-a-t-e-x)


Salvador Dali, Summer.

bobbycaputo:

Spectacular 70-Year-Old Traffic Jam In A Belgian Forest

These pictures are taken in a forest in Belgium. Chatillion Car Graveyard, is the worlds largest abandoned car graveyard. The cars were left during World War II by U.S. soldiers who were stationed in southern Belgium.

(via braiker)

humansofnewyork:

"What’s your greatest struggle right now?"
"The death of my husband."
"How’d you meet?"
"I was at a party on Fire Island, and this man walked in. I was about 25 at the time and recently divorced. I thought: ‘He looks interesting, I should get to know him.’ We ended up talking all night long. The next morning we were engaged, and two weeks later we were married."
"So what did he say when he asked you to marry him?"
"He didn’t really ask. He just said: ‘Let’s get married.’"

humansofnewyork:

"What’s your greatest struggle right now?""The death of my husband.""How’d you meet?""I was at a party on Fire Island, and this man walked in. I was about 25 at the time and recently divorced. I thought: ‘He looks interesting, I should get to know him.’ We ended up talking all night long. The next morning we were engaged, and two weeks later we were married.""So what did he say when he asked you to marry him?""He didn’t really ask. He just said: ‘Let’s get married.’"

travelingcolors:

Floating Ripple Vases (by oodesign)

Fill your favorite container with water and float the vase. According to the movement of the air, the plants change their position within the container.

(Source: travelingcolors, via apornstarsfuneral)

mymodernmet:

Budapest-based photographer Bianka Schumann's series Arkhai captures the fragile transition from childhood to adulthood. Using her younger brother and his best friend as subjects, Schumann documents the secretive “no man’s land” of adolescence in evocative portraits.

pbh3:

Happy animals!

(Source: pleatedjeans)

beautilation:

yaaaassss

(Source: waterproofsportswatch)

beautilation:

yaaaassss

stacksbreadup:

So real

the bridesmaids are mad nervous

(via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

1950s Prom and Party Dresses: Pastels

(via beautilation)

mudwerks:

(via Film Noir Photos: Outlandish Hats: Jetta Goudal)

Forbidden Woman (1927)

zannaka:

PLOMP @ Artereal Gallery Louise Zhang

(via l-a-t-e-x)

zannaka:

PLOMP @ Artereal Gallery Louise Zhang